HSUS Condemns Oregon’s Cougar and Wolf Decisions

“I think people expected better of Oregon.

Most Oregonians did, that’s for sure. So, the appointed managers entrusted with preserving Oregon’s grand and diverse wildlife heritage need to reconvene and reverse course. Right away.

Or Gov. Kate Brown needs to intervene in defense of our wild animals and to uphold the will of Oregonians.

Today, there are only 90 wolves in the whole state. By any measure, and most of all by the metric of common sense, that is the very definition of endangered. Wolves deserve the protection that Oregon affords animals on the brink.

But the state Fish and Wildlife Commission has decreed otherwise. Turning back the clock a century, the commission has cracked open the door to trophy hunters who want to add another glass-eyed stuffed head to their living room wall. Commissioners voted to eliminate endangered-species protections for our wolves in big swaths of our wildlands.

As they say in the comedy shows, I’m not making this up. Ninety wolves. Go get ’em!

You can make up your own mind whether commissioners lived up to their responsibility. As they themselves put it: to protect and enhance Oregon’s fish and wildlife and their habitats for use and enjoyment by present and future generations.

Future generations. Ha! This is a nasty, back-door win for a small number of trophy hunters. A fatal loss for wolves. A thumb in the eye to countless thousands of Oregonians who understand the simple truth: The state’s eco-system has been imbalanced. Nature knows best.

Commissioners, do your job: Protect the 90.

And while you’re at it, you can reverse your equally wrong-headed decision to allow the wholesale slaughter by trophy hunters of all cougars living in target zones located on 6,236 square miles of Oregon’s wildlands.

Commissioners will say that lifting endangered species protection for wolves doesn’t automatically signal a return to trophy hunting. Then why do it? Perhaps in hopes that the people of Oregon will be busy paying attention to other matters as the demise of the wolf plays out step-by-step?

What a cynical, lopsided approach to governance.

Commissioners would like people to believe that 90 wolves are taking too many deer away from 1.7 million licensed hunters. Really — 90 vs. 1,700,000?

Either commissioners don’t understand nature, or don’t want you to. To the extent that wolves prey on deer, they remove the old and the weak. Hunters are gunning for the big and the strong. So which is the better strategy for healthy deer populations?

The truth is simple: Oregon’s native carnivores keep our ecosystems healthy and diverse. Countless eons of history prove it. Oregonians want wildlife to flourish. Wolves and cougars have a far better track record than these few appointed officials doing the bidding of trophy hunters.

Commissioners, please meet again and vote for nature, not against it. For all Oregonians, not just the few with “trophy” rooms.

Governor, please lend your good office to the cause. The people of Oregon deserve better than they got this time.” ~Scott Beckstead

Scott Beckstead of Sutherlin is senior Oregon state director for the Humane Society of the United States. He can be reached at sbeckstead@humanesociety.org.

Originally posted by The Statesman Journal

Photo By Jeremy Weber

Keep Wolves Listed

29 other scientists say Great Lakes wolves should stay protected under the Endangered Species Act and they disagree with the idea that keeping wolves on the list increases public resentment.
In a statement Tuesday, the scientists said Great Lakes wolves should stay on the list for now. They question the adequacy of state management plans and contend the wolves still meet the legal definition of an endangered species.

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Lifting government protection from wolves in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin could be justified if and when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service “uses the best available science that justifies delisting,” 29 scientists from the U.S. and several other nations said in an open letter. “Currently it does not.”

The scientists also said they were responding to 26 colleagues who sent a letter last week to U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell saying it was time for wolves to lose their endangered status in the western Great Lakes, where their combined population is estimated at 3,700.
YAY!
Full story here

26 scientists are urging the western Great Lakes population of gray wolves be removed from protections of the Endangered Species Act

With a heavy heart and incredible disappointment, I chose this image to share with you today. The image contains a quote from one of the scientists betraying our wolves by urging the western Great Lakes population of gray wolves be removed from protections of the Endangered Species Act.

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26 scientists, including Dave Mech of the University of Minnesota and Adrian Wydeven of the Timber Wolf Alliance, argue the species has successfully recovered in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin and should be delisted.
“It is in the best interests of gray wolf conservation and for the integrity of the Endangered Species Act for wolves to be delisted in the western Great Lakes states where biological recovery has occurred and where adequate regulatory mechanisms are in place to manage the species,” wrote the scientists in a letter delivered Wednesday to Sally Jewell, Secretary of the Department of Interior, and Dan Ashe, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
More information can be found in this article.
This is our letter to Secretary Jewell regarding the delisting, and why we disagree with the recommendation of these scientists:
When Congress passed the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973, it recognized that our rich natural heritage is of “aesthetic, ecological, educational, recreational, and scientific value to our Nation and its people.” It further expressed concern that many of our nation’s native plants and animals were in danger of becoming extinct, including wolves. With the exception of the red wolf and mexican gray wolf, the USFWS determined the wolves a recovered species in 2013, proclaiming that “the current listing for gray wolf, developed 35 years ago, erroneously included large geographical areas outside the species’ historical range”.
The wolf cannot possibly be considered a recovered species when the estimated population is only approximately 5,000 in the lower 48, occupies less than 10 percent of their historic range and when the Endangered Species Act dictates wolves be restored to a “significant portion” of that original range before they are ready for delisting.
“Historic range”, which, broadly stated, refers to the area a species occupied before humans began exterminating them. Yet in an interview with Lance Richardson, the Assistant Director for Endangered Species at the FWS, Gary Frazier said: “Range, is the range at the time at which we’re making a determination of whether a species is threatened or endangered.” In other words, range is where an animal lives at the particular moment the Fish and Wildlife Service decides to list it, not where it used to live before it was widely persecuted. This notion, coupled with delisting because of a taxonomic revision, a revision Fish and Wildlife Service previously rejected as representing “neither a scientific consensus nor the majority opinion of researchers on the taxonomy of wolves” is plainly undermining the ESA, as well as a convenient way for the USFWS to delist the gray wolf.
History has demonstrated that societal values ultimately determine the survival of a species as controversial as the wolf. Wolf management evokes a wide range of public attitudes, polarized views, and prolonged contention. Removing the gray wolf from the ESA is unsettling to most Americans who enjoy seeing the wolf on the landscape and who understand how essential they are for maintaining ecosystems. Removing the gray wolf from the protection of the ESA is unlike lifting protections for any other species. Blatant hostility, as well as the vilification of these essential predators, coupled with the very poor management by individual states during delisting underscores the need for continued protection. Because of this mismanagement, and ongoing horrific slaughter of wolves allowed by individual states, those who advocate for wolves are not only driven to keep wolves protected, but will also be electing government officials who agree with their views and show compassion for this misunderstood carnivore.
The mismanagement of wolves:
Last year, H.B. 470 was signed into law creating a wolf control board in Idaho with the explicit purpose of killing all but 150 of the state’s remaining 650 wolves. State officials would have preferred total extermination—“If every wolf in Idaho disappeared I wouldn’t have a problem with it,” the new Fish and Game commissioner declared, at his confirmation hearing.
The fact is that in 2011, when the government began stripping wolves of their protection under the Endangered Species Act, transferring “management” to the states an “all-out” war against the wolf began, and by December 2014 over 3,400 wolves had been slaughtered in just six states, more than 1,956 in Idaho and Montana alone.
In Wisconsin, the population of wolves was just 800 in 2011, yet in a matter of three years (since delisting), Wisconsin has lost at least 518 wolves to legalized hunting, hounding, trapping and annual unenforced quota overkills.The 518 wolves killed does not include wolves killed at the request of livestock operators for “depredation control” (170) or wolves killed on roadways every year (25). In addition, it is difficult for agency staff to estimate how many wolves are poached, which is estimated, conservatively at 100 a year. Considering annual wolf pup mortality at up to 75 percent, and the human take of wolves in Wisconsin, this has been a disaster of catastrophic proportions. Hardly a wolf management plan integrating the “best available science”.
This moral bankruptcy and ineptness is not a way to treat a species recently removed from the ESA.
Until our state governments can evolve, stop catering to whims of the few, listen to the majority of their constituents, and follow good science our wolves need to remain under government protections. Period.

Copyright © 2015 [COPYRIGHT Intheshadowofthewolf, name and webpage]. All Rights Reserved.

RIP Diesel

Animalista Untamed

On November 19th early in the morning while it was still dark the French police raided an apartment in St Denis, north Paris. BBC News was reporting as the drama unfolded. What it failed to mention was that of the Research, Assistance, Intervention and Deterrence (Raid) unit the first to go in was Diesel, a female Belgian Shepherd dog.

According to The Guardian newspaper “Diesel had been sent in to the apartment ahead of officers to ascertain how dangerous the situation was when it was shot dead.”

She was just 7 years old.

There is so much wrong with this – where do I start?

First of all, Diesel was not an ‘it’. She was a she. Calling her ‘it’ indicates that she is an object of no significance.

Then let’s talk about the early evening television news in which the raid was reported by various on-the-spot correspondents. I did not see…

View original post 359 more words

Alexander Archipelago Wolves on Prince of Wales~ Online Storm #3

Feature image: Monty Sloan

A petition asking for emergency Endangered Species Act listing for Prince of Wales Island wolves was essentially denied by the U.S.Department of the Interior office in Anchorage.

USFWS Assistant Regional Director stated that an emergency listing is not something that can be petitioned by outside groups, and is a process “left to the discretion of the Secretary of the Interior.” Secretary Jewell is expected to make a decision regarding protecting these wolves under the ESA by the end of the year. Raise your voice for these imperiled wolves. Please partake in the actions within this blog aimed at encouraging Secretary Sally Jewell  to protect the little dark wolves on Prince of Wales islands.

As always, a warm welcome, and thankyou in advance for being a voice for this imperiled species. On this blog post you will find several courses of action. If you are not on twitter, please scroll to the bottom (past the list of tweets) for other actions. The storm begins at 2:00 p.m. EST on November 9th. Feel free to send off these tweets as often as you like thereafter.

#Wolves #StandForWolves Tweetstorm now! Please be a voice for the #PrinceOfWalesWolves Please tweet this link: http://wp.me/p6o9qd-5W  Tweet4Wolves

Please provide #ESA protection to preserve the few #wolves that remain. #PrinceOfWalesWolves @POTUS @Interior @USFWS #StandForWolves  Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves nearly wiped out in 1 yr, plummeting 2 as low as 50 individuals, protect under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @DirectorDanAshe Tweet4Wolves

These R dire times for 1 of world’s rarest wolf subspecies. #PrinceOfWalesWolves Pls protect under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @interior @USFWS Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves a unique subspecies of North American #wolves, from which they have been isolated for millennia are highly endangered Tweet4Wolves

The long-term impacts of logging & roads have pushed #PrinceOfWalesWolves population
toward #extinction @SecretaryJewell @DirectorDanAshe Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves R a symbol of wilderness and ecological integrity and have declined 75% in 20yrs @SecretaryJewell @nytimes @latimes Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves play an important role in the ecotourism that contributes more than $1 billion 2 Southeast #Alaska economy @interior Tweet4Wolves

6 decades of @usfs aggressive old-growth clearcut #logging program on POW has endangered #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior @nytimes @latimes Tweet4Wolves

6 decades of @forestservice aggressive old-growth clearcut #logging program on POW has endangered #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior @WSJ @NPR Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves rely almost exclusively on a single prey species, also in decline, the Sitka black-tailed deer @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves and the deer have suffered over the past few decades as #logging has eroded their island habitats. @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

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Roads built 2 support logging effort provide easy access points 4 poachers 2 enter forest & kill #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

The POW Complex has over 4,200 miles of roads contributing to a marked increase in poaching of the #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Over 1/2 of the old-growth forests that #PrinceOfWalesWolves rely on for hunting, denning & raising pups R now gone! @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

.@usfs approved an ill-conceived logging operation within the Tongass National Forest, home to #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

.@forestservice approved an ill-conceived logging operation within the Tongass National Forest, home 2 #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior @WSJ Tweet4Wolves

Shame on @usfs 4 pushing ahead w/6,000 acres old-growth logging & 80 more miles of logging road thru #PrinceOfWalesWolves habitat @interior Tweet4Wolves

Shame on @forestservice 4 pushing ahead w/6,000 acres old-growth logging in #PrinceOfWalesWolves habitat for 15 more yrs @interior Tweet4Wolves

Shame on @usfs 4 pushing ahead w/6,000 acres old-growth logging & 80 more miles of logging road thru #PrinceOfWalesWolves habitat @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Timber sales cost taxpayers millions in the Tongass & will cause extinction of #PrinceOfWalesWolves @usfs @interior goo.gl/LPCrVM Tweet4Wolves

Timber sales cost taxpayers millions in Tongass & will cause extinction~ #PrinceOfWalesWolves @forestservice @USFWS goo.gl/LPCrVM Tweet4Wolves

Heavily reliant on old-growth forests, #PrinceOfWalesWolves den in the root systems of very large trees @SecretaryJewell @usfs @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Scientific evidence shows that #PrinceOfWalesWolves cannot survive in areas with high road density @interior @USFWS @nytimes @latimes Tweet4Wolves

.@usfs seems more interested in kowtowing to the timber industry than in preserving our forests 4 future generations #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

.@forestservice is more interested in kowtowing 2 timber industry than in preserving our forests 4 future generations #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

The ongoing scale of old-growth logging imperils #PrinceOfWalesWolves by further reducing & fragmenting remaining forest stands @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Threats to this unique subspecies R amplified because #PrinceOfWalesWolves represent a distinct & isolated gene pool. Protect #ESA @USFWS Tweet4Wolves

Only 7 to 32 female #PrinceOfWalesWolves in an approximate 2,600 square mile area! Protect under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @USFWS @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

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Possibly only 1 breeding female wolf per 371.4 square miles. Protect #PrinceOfWalesWolves under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @USFWS @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves risk of inbreeding is⬆putting them at great risk of extinction due 2 loss of genetic diversity @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Genetic diversity is always a crucial factor with isolated species! Protect #PrinceOfWalesWolves under ESA @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

A declaration of threatened or endangered status for #PrinceOfWalesWolves is a logical step toward recovery @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

In SE #Alaska #PrinceOfWalesWolves bring significant economic benefits 2 communities ~ Essential4Ecotourism @interior @USFWS @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Evidence suggests ecological heterogeneity across space can influence genetic structure of populations #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior Tweet4Wolves

Evidence suggests ecological heterogeneity across space can influence genetic structure of populations #PrinceOfWalesWolves @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Research found the presence of a genetic cline between mainland & island wolves. Protect #PrinceOfWalesWolves #ESA bit.ly/1GHqCyw  Tweet4Wolves

#Wolves #ArchipelagoWolves Tweetstorm now! B a voice for the #PrinceOfWalesWolves Please tweet this link: http://wp.me/p6o9qd-5W   Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves R an ecologically important & genetically distinct predator that symbolizes the wilderness of the Tongass @interior Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves R an ecologically important & genetically distinct predator that symbolizes the wilderness of the Tongass @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Population decline of #PrinceOfWalesWolves –
39 wolves per 1000 km2 in the fall of 1994. population: GMU2 – 352
@SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Population decline of #PrinceOfWalesWolves –
38 wolves per 1000 km2 in the fall of 2003. Population GMU2- 343 @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Population decline of #PrinceOfWalesWolves –
24.5 wolves per 1000 km2 in the fall of 2013 Population GMU2 – 221 @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Decline of #PrinceOfWalesWolves
9.9 wolves per 1000 km2 fall/2014. Population GMU2 – 89 prior to 2014/2015 hunt @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

The estimates were made prior 2 the 2014/2015 hunting/trapping season, wherein 29 #PrinceOfWalesWolves known 2 be killed #EndangeredSpecies Tweet4Wolves

These numbers don’t include #PrinceOfWalesWolves killed by poachers. With 580 miles logging roads wolf poaching is rife! #EndangeredSpecies Tweet4Wolves

The “harvest” quota of 9 #PrinceOfWalesWolves 4 the 2015-2016 seasons is impossible to enforce @SecretaryJewell @nytimes #EndangeredSpecies Tweet4Wolves

An unenforceable “harvest” of 9 #PrinceOfWalesWolves with a population as low as 50 individuals is disgraceful @interior @USFWS @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

With a population as low as 50 #PrinceOfWalesWolves this year’s season will push this iconic species 2 the brink of #extinction @interior Tweet4Wolves

Both ADF&G & FSB attempt to enforce a season’s #PrinceOfWalesWolves quota by counting skins that R brought in 4 sealing @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

FSB regulation: #PrinceOfWalesWolves skins taken by hunting &trapping must B sealed within 14 days, overquota inevitable @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

ADF&G #PrinceOfWalesWolves taken by hunting require “skin” sealing within 30 days, a guaranteed overquota! @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Regardless of which “skin sealing” time limit applies, it is nearly impossible 2 enforce such a small quota! @interior #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

The quota for 2014/2015 was exceeded by 16% despite an emergency order closing the season! #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior @nytimes @latimes Tweet4Wolves

The smaller the quota of #PrinceOfWalesWolves the greater the chances R of the quota being exceeded! @interior @nytimes @latimes @USFWS Tweet4Wolves

Further compounding this disastrous situation is the unregulated amount of, & location of, trappers/hunters #PrinceOfWalesWolves @interior Tweet4Wolves

Further compounding this disastrous situation is the unregulated amount of, & location of, trappers/hunters #PrinceOfWalesWolves @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Neither the State nor the FSB have regulations that limit number of trappers/hunters who may take #PrinceOfWalesWolves in GMU -2 @interior Tweet4Wolves

Neither the State nor the FSB have regulations that limit number of trappers/hunters who may take #PrinceOfWalesWolves in GMU -2 @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

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If the decline in numbers is not arrested & recovery not immediately commenced, #PrinceOfWalesWolves fate will B sealed. @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

To save #PrinceOfWalesWolves the @usfs needs to aggressively close timber roads in the Prince of Wales Complex @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

.@SecretaryJewell The decline of #PrinceOfWalesWolves is a management problem that desperately needs fixing: http://wp.me/p6o9qd-5s   Tweet4Wolves

.@usfs Pls do not disregarded the evidence and the impacts of your timber program on #PrinceOfWalesWolves http://wp.me/p6o9qd-5s  Tweet4Wolves

.@usfs Large-scale #logging of old-growth timber in the #Tongass puts forest management there 20 to 40 years behind the rest of the nation Tweet4Wolves

.@DirectorDanAshe The True Culprit behind Drastic Wolf Declines in the Tongass http://wp.me/p6o9qd-5s Protect #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves R facing  threat of extinction due 2 lack of food, hunting/poaching & logging, please report @nytimes @washingtonpost Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves R facing  threat of extinction due 2 lack of food, hunting/poaching & logging, please report @latimes @AP @Alaska @NPR Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves R facing  threat of extinction due 2 lack of food, hunting/poaching & logging, pls report @WSJ @newsminer @adndotcom Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves R facing  threat of extinction due 2 lack of food, hunting/poaching & logging, pls report @LATenviroment @alaskapublic Tweet4Wolves

Roads constructed 4 old-growth logging facilitate substantial illegal poaching @interior @usfs @nytimes @adndotcom #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

Obviously hunting, trapping, & #poaching usually take place near roads because access is easier @SecretaryJewell @usfs #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

The farther from a road #PrinceOfWalesWolves or deer are the more likely they will survive @interior @nytimes However… Tweet4Wolves

…with such an extensive network of existing roads poaching is rife! @interior @nytimes @usfs #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

Average distance 2 roads within GMU2 is 2.1 miles & only 1.7 miles on POW Island itself @interior @nytimes @usfs #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

Such high road density leaves little secure habitat for #PrinceOfWalesWolves or Sitka black tailed deer @interior @nytimes @usfs Tweet4Wolves

40% of #PrinceOfWalesWolves home is logged/roaded (GMU2) creating a very high risk mortality which exceeds reproduction @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

When just 25% of #PrinceOfWalesWolves home is logged, the ratio of reproduction to mortality is very close to 1 @interior @nytimes @usfs Tweet4Wolves

.@usfs wants public 2believe ADF&G’s mgmt of trapping/hunting can mitigate effects of overlogging/habitat destruction! #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

#Wolves #PrinceOfWalesWolves #StandForWolves PLS sign and share: Defend rare Alaskan wolf habitat: http://t.co/VRqHodBlo1       Tweet4Wolves

#StandForWolves Save the Tongass National Forest home of the #PrinceOfWalesWolves  Please sign and share: https://t.co/GFFt7HPVch    Tweet4Wolves

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Over 1/2 of the old-growth forests that the #PrinceOfWalesWolves rely on for hunting, denning & raising pups R now gone! @nytimes @latimes Tweet4Wolves

The @usfs approved an ill-conceived logging operation within the Tongass National Forest, the #PrinceOfWalesWolves home… @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

The @usfs approved an ill-conceived logging operation within the Tongass National Forest, the #PrinceOfWalesWolves home @WSJ @AP @nytimes  Tweet4Wolves

.@usfs approved an ill-conceived logging operation within Tongass National Forest, the #PrinceOfWalesWolves home @latimes @washingtonpost  Tweet4Wolves

Lack of old-growth forests 4 protection, #PrinceOfWalesWolves primary prey, Sitka black-tailed deer, R also in decline @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

Timber sales cost taxpayers millions in the Tongass and #PrinceOfWalesWolves pay with their lives, #Extinction @WSJ @AP @NPR goo.gl/LPCrVM  Tweet4Wolves

Timber sales cost taxpayers millions in the Tongass & #PrinceOfWalesWolves pay with their lives, #Extinction @nytimes  goo.gl/LPCrVM  Tweet4Wolves

Timber sales cost taxpayers millions in the Tongass & #PrinceOfWalesWolves pay with their lives,  @washingtonpost goo.gl/LPCrVM  Tweet4Wolves

Timber sales cost taxpayers millions in the Tongass & #PrinceOfWalesWolves pay with their lives!  @interior goo.gl/LPCrVM Tweet4Wolves

2014-2015 harvest of #PrinceOfWalesWolves was unsustainable. These rare wolves need protection under #ESA now.  @nytimes  @washingtonpost Tweet4Wolves

2014-2015 harvest of #PrinceOfWalesWolves was unsustainable. These rare wolves need protection under #ESA now @latimes @AP @NPR @Alaska Tweet4Wolves

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2014-2015 harvest of #PrinceOfWalesWolves was unsustainable. These rare wolves need protection under #ESA now @WSJ @newsminer @adndotcom Tweet4Wolves

29 #PrinceOfWalesWolves killed in 2014-2015 trapping/hunting season represents a loss of 1/3 of entire population! @nytimes @washingtonpost Tweet4Wolves

29 #PrinceOfWalesWolves killed in 2014-2015 trapping/hunting season represents loss of 1/3 of entire population! @AP @latimes @NPR @Alaska Tweet4Wolves

29 #PrinceOfWalesWolves killed in 2014-2015 trapping/hunting season represents loss of 1/3 of entire population @SecretaryJewell @adndotcom Tweet4Wolves

The hunting & trapping of #PrinceOfWalesWolves has reached unsustainable levels. Cancel the hunt! @AkGovBillWalker #EndangeredSpecies Tweet4Wolves

The hunting & trapping of #PrinceOfWalesWolves has reached unsustainable levels! Protect under ESA @SecretaryJewell #EndangeredSpecies Tweet4Wolves

ADF&G estimated only 89 #PrinceOfWalesWolves fall 2014, down from 221 the prior yr possibly as low as 50. Cancel the hunt @AKGovBillWalker Tweet4Wolves

ADF&G estimated only 89 #PrinceOfWalesWolves fall 2014, down from 221 the prior yr, now possibly as low as 50! @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

Data in ADF&G report shows that, as of fall 2014, only 7 to 32 female #PrinceOfWalesWolves were left. Protect under #ESA @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

.@USFWS is years overdue in deciding whether to initiate an #ESA status review for Alaska’s #PrinceOfWalesWolves @SecretaryJewel @AP @WSJ Tweet4Wolves

.@USFWS is years overdue in deciding whether to initiate an #ESA status review for Alaska’s #PrinceOfWalesWolves @WSJ @nytimes @AP @NPR Tweet4Wolves

After yrs delaying @USFWS  is finally working toward a year-end determination on whether 2 protect #PrinceOfWalesWolves under ESA! @WSJ @AP Tweet4Wolves

This yrs season will jeopardize the ongoing viability of #PrinceOfWalesWolves #ESA protection now! @WSJ @nytimes @AP @NPR @latimes Tweet4Wolves

This yrs season will jeopardize the ongoing viability of #PrinceOfWalesWolves @SecretaryJewell @DirectorDanAshe #Extinction is forever! Tweet4Wolves

Scientific data confirms a 60 % decline in the #PrinceOfWalesWolves population in just 1 yr. Protect under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

With population as low as 50 there is certainly no time 4 debate. Please protect #PrinceOfWalesWolves under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

This yrs season of trapping and hunting will push the incredibly imperiled #PrinceOfWalesWolves closer to #extinction @interior @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

2 maintain a viable population of #PrinceOfWalesWolves , #Alaska must cancel the season! @SecretaryJewell @DirectorDanAshe @AKGovBillWalker  Tweet4Wolves

This will no longer be a genetically viable population @AKGovBillWalker with as few as 7 to 32 female #PrinceOfWalesWolves Cancel the hunt! Tweet4Wolves

#StandForWolves  #SaveWolves Take Emergency Measures to Save Nearly-Extinct #PrinceOfWalesWolves Please sign: goo.gl/nBxK0a Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves genetically & geographically distinct from other gray wolves, urgently need protection under #ESA @nytimes @Interior Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves genetically & geographically distinct from other gray wolves, urgently need protection under #ESA @washingtonpost @AP Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves genetically & geographically distinct from other gray wolves, urgently need protection under #ESA @WSJ @NPR @latimes Tweet4Wolves

ADF&G reports there could B as few as 7 female #PrinceOfWalesWolves left on 2,600-square-mile isl. Cancel 2015/16 hunt! @AKGovBillWalker Tweet4Wolves

Alaska wildlife officials contend: “no radical changes are necessary” 4 managing nearly extinct #PrinceOfWalesWolves population Outrageous! Tweet4Wolves

ADF&G found that one wolf pack “seems” to have completely disappeared. Protect #PrinceOfWalesWolves under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

The % of #PrinceOfWalesWolves killed last season was between 33 & 58 % of ENTIRE population. Protect under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Endangered #PrinceOfWalesWolves & associated islands R geographically isolated & genetically distinct from other #wolves. @WSJ @AP @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

Endangered #PrinceOfWalesWolves & associated islands R geographically isolated & genetically distinct from other #wolves. @washingtonpost Tweet4Wolves

The 89 #PrinceOfWalesWolves pop. estimate is outdated, @usfs briefing paper indicates, protect under #ESA @SecretaryJewell @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

The estimates were made prior 2 the 2014/2015 hunting/trapping season, wherein 29 #PrinceOfWalesWolves known 2 be killed #EndangeredSpecies  Tweet4Wolves

The estimates were made prior 2 the 2014/2015 hunting/trapping season, wherein 29 #PrinceOfWalesWolves known 2 be killed @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

The estimates were made prior 2 the 2014/2015 hunting/trapping season, wherein 29 #PrinceOfWalesWolves known 2 be killed @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

These numbers don’t include #PrinceOfWalesWolves killed by poachers. With 580 miles logging roads wolf poaching is rife! #EndangeredSpecies Tweet4Wolves

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These numbers don’t include #PrinceOfWalesWolves killed by poachers. With 580 miles logging roads wolf poaching is rife! @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

These numbers don’t include #PrinceOfWalesWolves killed by poachers. With 580 miles logging roads wolf poaching is rife! @nytimes Tweet4Wolves

#Wolves #PrinceOfWalesWolves
Please sign: Stop the Hunt & Kill of the Rare #ArchipelagoWolves: bit.ly/1kzbUiD  Tweet4Wolves

#Wolves #StandForWolves
From @alaskawild: Don’t let #PrinceOfWalesWolves Disappear Please sign bit.ly/1Pt0kkW  Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves Please sign this petition with 143,000 signatures, Save The Alexander #ArchipelagoWolves: chn.ge/20AB6q7  Tweet4Wolves

Scientific data clearly shows that the SE Alaska #PrinceOfWalesWolves R distinctive from other wolf populations in N.A. #EndangeredSpecies Tweet4Wolves

ADF&G doesn’t believe #PrinceOfWalesWolves warrant #ESA listing, a designation that would restrict costly2taxpayer logging industry! Shame! Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves need prompt #ESA protection because of their geographic isolation and proven genetic distinctiveness @USFWS @AP @WSJ Tweet4Wolves

Scientific evidence shows significant genetic differentiation between #PrinceOfWalesWolves & interior wolves @AP : goo.gl/a3wA7U  Tweet4Wolves

Recent genetic research shows a large portion of genetic diversity in gray wolf species is found in #PrinceOfWalesWolves @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

The unique genetic diversity found in #PrinceOfWalesWolves makes them especially important from a conservation perspective @SecretaryJewell Tweet4Wolves

Evidence shows significant genetic differentiation between #PrinceOfWalesWolves & interior wolves @SecretaryJewell goo.gl/a3wA7U  Tweet4Wolves

87% of #PrinceOfWalesWolves mortality is from unsustainable hunting/trapping Cancel the hunt @AKGovBillWalker protect under ESA @USFWS @AP Tweet4Wolves

During the highest harvest year, in 1996-1997, almost 50% of #PrinceOfWalesWolves population was trapped @nytimes @WSJ @AP @washingtonpost Tweet4Wolves

1 of the fiercest critics of @usfs Big Thorne timber sale, in #PrinceOfWalesWolves home, is former ADF&G biologist Dave Person @AP @WSJ Tweet4Wolves

Person:“The timber sale, the final straw that will break the back of sustainable wolf-deer predator-prey ecology” @AP #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

Person:“The timber sale, the final straw that will break the back of sustainable wolf-deer predator-prey ecology” @WSJ #PrinceOfWalesWolves Tweet4Wolves

Dave Person:“The Big Thorne project puts viability of #PrinceOfWalesWolves in doubt.”  goo.gl/bqU0Dv  Tweet4Wolves

Dr. Person audio report regarding @usfs  Big Thorne timber sale & impact on wildlife & #PrinceOfWalesWolves @AP https://vimeo.com/92984376  Tweet4Wolves

Old growth logging has compromised the environmental & economic viability of the Tongass & forsaken the #PrinceOfWalesWolves @AP @WSJ @NPR Tweet4Wolves

The rapid decline of #PrinceOfWalesWolves underscores the threat continued cutting of old-growth trees poses in the Tongass @AP @WSJ @NPR Tweet4Wolves

The rapid decline of #PrinceOfWalesWolves underscores the threat continued cutting of old-growth trees poses in the Tongass @washingtonpost Tweet4Wolves

24 yrs ago authorities recognized #PrinceOfWalesWolves viability was in danger as direct result of timber harvest in Tongass @AP @WSJ @NPR Tweet4Wolves

24yrs ago authorities recognized #PrinceOfWalesWolves viability was in danger as direct result of timber harvest in Tongass @washingtonpost Tweet4Wolves

24yrs ago FWS said “Without significant changes 2existing Tongass LMP, long-term viability of #PrinceOfWalesWolves is seriously imperiled.” Tweet4Wolves

Logging roads clearly increased risk of death 4 #PrinceOfWalesWolves from hunting/trapping & contributed 2unsustainable rates of “harvest” Tweet4Wolves

ADF&G should consider effects of roads, & expect substantial illegal harvest where #PrinceOfWalesWolves habitat is accessible 2 humans! @AP Tweet4Wolves

.@usfs should consider effects of roads & expect substantial illegal harvest where #PrinceOfWalesWolves habitat is accessible 2 humans! @AP Tweet4Wolves

ADF&G, knowing poaching levels R as high as legal “take” should act2 PROTECT remaining #PrinceOfWalesWolves NOT encourage hunting! @AP @WSJ Tweet4Wolves

.@SecretaryJewell @DirectorDanAshe pls take decisive action 2 save rapidly dwindling population of #PrinceOfWalesWolves #ESA protection pls Tweet4Wolves

#PrinceOfWalesWolves R an essential piece of what makes our little corner of Alaska so special,” said H. McIntosh of @AlaskaSmallShip @AP Tweet4Wolves

The opportunity 2C unique #PrinceOfWalesWolves in old growth home draws people frm all over the world Essential4Ecotourism @AKGovBillWalker Tweet4Wolves

A sharp decline in #PrinceOfWalesWolves equals a sharp decline in ecotourism.”Killing wolves is bad for business” @AKGovBillWalker @AP @WSJ Tweet4Wolves

Allowing decimation/imminent extinction of #PrinceOfWalesWolves is poor stewardship @SecretaryJewell @AKGovBillWalker @DirectorDanAshe @AP Tweet4Wolves

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#StandForWolves #SaveWolves #ProtectWolves Save the #PrinceOfWalesWolves Protect under #ESA @interior @DirectorDanAshe Tweet4Wolves

Thankyou for tweeting on behalf of the Alexander Archipelago Wolves. Please consider contacting Secretary Jewell with a phone call, an email and a letter. Below you will find a sample letter, feel free to use it as is, or personalize to your liking.

Here are a few ways you can contact the U.S. Department of the Interior and Secretary Jewell:

Mailing Address:
Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, N.W.
Washington DC 20240

Phone: (202) 208-3100
or directly to Mrs Jewell’s office: 202-208-7351

E-Mail: feedback@ios.doi.gov

Or directly to Mrs. Jewell: Secretary_jewell@ios.doi.gov

Or through the DOI Feedback form

Dear Secretary Jewell,

Please protect the Alexander Archipelago Wolves on Prince of Wales islands under the Endangered Species Act. Scientists and conservationists assert that the Archipelago wolf population has plummeted to a dangerously low population, and that distributions are no longer sufficient to maintain genetic viability. More importantly, existing regulations (which have not been adhered to) with the failing taxpayer supported logging  projects on Prince of Wales are not adequate enough protection to ensure persistence of population numbers of this unique species.

This alarming population decline is most immediately caused by the direct take of wolves from significant poaching and the unsustainable legal take, but the underlying cause is extensive logging and roads that initiate many harmful effects, including the overharvest of wolves. Without immediate policy changes on the part of the state and federal governments, the Alexander Archipelago Wolves on Prince of Wales and satellite islands future is grim, as they appear to be on their way to extinction.

Wolves are a symbol of wilderness and ecological integrity. They are important in their own right and as a key part of a functioning predator- prey system. In Southeast Alaska, wolves bring significant economic benefits to communities as part of the package that lures more than one million visitors to the Tongass National Forest every year and that contributes more than $1 billion to the Southeast Alaska economy.

The time has come for the Forest Service to manage the Tongass for a host of public values that support the Southeast Alaska tourism. The time has come for this diminished, and unique, population of wolves to finally get the protection they so desperately need if they are to survive.

Please provide protection for the POW wolves under the ESA. Thankyou for your time and consideration of this extremely urgent matter,

Your name

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If you are on Facebook please post to U.S. Department of the Interior (or tag them in a post). Please use the hashtag #PrinceOfWalesWolves on your post. Use any one of the images throughout this blog, just tap on image, open image, then select save. If you are on Instagram, please tag the interior in the same way. Be sure to use the hashtag #PrinceOfWalesWolves.

Images are also posted on our event page, feel free to use any in your tags.

Thankyou, everyone, for your dedication and ongoing efforts on behalf of Alaska’s little dark wolves.

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