Category Archives: Coyotes

Stand Against The Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Act (H.R. 2406)

H.R. 2406 (The SHARE Act) is related to the Sportsmen’s Act (S.405, S.659, S.556) in the Senate, but contains several different provisions. 

PLEASE SIGN AND SHARE:
WE THE PEOPLE PETITION THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO: VETO H.R. 2406

bit.ly/VetoTheShareAct (signature must be verified by email)

Bill Description (scroll down for tweets as well as a simple cut and paste email to send to your Senators and President Obama):

This omnibus bill combines many bad bills related to environmental resources into one. There are several problematic portions with dire implications for wildlife and the ecosystems they need to thrive. This is Congress at its worst: pandering to special interests and sacrificing smart conservation policy for political cache (adding insult to injury, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that enacting this foul piece of legislation would cost $24 million over the 2016-2020 period and $1 million after 2020, assuming appropriation of the authorized and necessary amounts).

One portion of H.R. 2406 would make it impossible for the Department of the Interior or the Department of Agriculture to consider the effects of any “chemical substance” in pistol, revolver, firearm, shell, cartridge, or sport fishing equipment, as outlined in the Toxic Substances Control Act. This bill would prevent federal agencies, and the scientists that work for them, from carrying out their duty to evaluate and protect the public and the environment from toxic substances. This is particularly relevant to our fight to eliminate lead from hunting equipment, because of its deadly effects on wildlife that ingest it. Federal agencies must retain the ability to make decisions based solely on the best available science, not guided by an uncalled for and unscientific bill.

Another section would allow the importation of 41 polar bear sport trophies from Canada. Between the proposal to list polar bears as threatened in 2006 and the final threatened listing in 2008, 41 hunters killed polar bears – despite repeated warnings from hunting organizations and government agencies that trophy imports would likely not be allowed as of the listing date. If Congress passes this new waiver on sport trophies and allows these hunters to import their kills, it would be rewarding their risky and ecologically unsound behavior. It would also set a precedent for Congressional leniency on the import of animals being considered for threatened or endangered listing, which could accelerate the pace of killing for any species proposed for listing in the future.

One of the most devastating provisions contains several alarming rollbacks of long-standing federal environmental and public land laws including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Wilderness Act, and the National Forest Management Act. In the process, it reduces or eliminates important protections for America’s public lands that have been in place for decades. For example, the bill would including trapping under the definition of hunting, conflating two entirely different activities and thereby opening hundreds of millions of public lands to cruel trapping. In addition, the bill would force land managers to prioritize hunting and trapping above other outdoor activities, effectively excluding a large proportion of the American public from enjoying national spaces that belong to all of us. This and other changes in H.R. 2406 are in direct conflict with the stated purpose of the Wilderness Act, which is to establish areas “where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.”

The African Elephant Conservation and Legal Ivory Possession Act, rolled into H.R. 2406, would halt efforts by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to crack down on the illegal ivory trade, particularly by undoing the restrictions on U.S. ivory imports and exports. African elephants are facing the greatest poaching crisis since the 1980s: more than 100,000 were killed from 2010 to 2012 – an average of one every 15 minutes. The appalling scale of poaching is intertwined with violent militias, organized crime, and government corruption in Africa. A crucial element of halting this ongoing slaughter is addressing the demand for ivory within our own borders. The regulations proposed by the FWS prohibit most imports and exports, and limit other commercial actions to ivory that was lawfully imported prior to 1990 (the date that elephants’ endangered status was elevated by the Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species). Prohibiting FWS from implementing these vital regulations would be an enormous step backward in the U.S.’s response to the wildlife trafficking crisis.

Other provisions in this huge bill would prevent the public from having a say in National Wildlife Refuge decisions, and waive important environmental reviews for this system as well. Such blind dedication to implementing recreational killing is detrimental to both conservation efforts and the public interest. As of Friday, February 26th, two additional, extremely troubling, amendments were voted on favorably and included in the SHARE Act. One, from Representative Don Young, which would roll back new federal rules on hunting predators on Alaska’s national preserves, and a similar proposed rule for refuges (National Park Service). The federal government wants the new rules to protect wolf and bear populations, while the state wants to control predator numbers to allow for more moose and caribou. The other added amendment would strip wolves of their federal protections in four states under the Endangered Species Act, subverting the judicial process and subjecting hundreds of wolves to hostile state practices such as baiting, hound hunting, and painful steel-jawed leghold traps. This amendment was offered by  Congressman Reid Ribble.

As this bill has passed the house with a final vote of 242 ayes to 161 nays the following tweets will be directed to the upper branch of Congress. For those of you who are new to my tweetstorms, all tweets are “click to tweet” just tap “Tweet4Wolves”. For ease of tweeting please open this blog on your browser and close your twitter window. In advance, thankyou for your time and support~In the shadow of the wolf.

Tell #Congress Don’t Gun Down Protections 4#Wolves: ow.ly/YDeNO    pic.twitter.com/UDmChL23Bn  Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS Please Veto H.R.2406 #SHAREAct #Lead poisoned Bald #Eagle that did not survive-Raptor EducationGroup. pic.twitter.com/yMbeFuL3SQ   Tweet4Wolves

Veto H.R.2406 #SHAREAct please sign: wh.gov/iG1Cv #Wolves

pic.twitter.com/sjUKKFyhLh  Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems #Elephants #Wolves #PolarBears #Wildlife #EnvironmentalToxins
#SHAREAct
There’s nothing sporting about … fb.me/7Eywks2VQ  Tweet4Wolves

#Wolves #Wildlife
#HR2406 #SHAREAct has passed the House with a vote of 242 ayes to 161 nays. Please contact…fb.me/2p41nwxoQ  Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems Please vote NO #SHAREAct #HR2406 #wolves have fought their way back from near-extinction… fb.me/7KYenUdiU  Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS Please VETO #SHAREAct #HR2406 #wolves have fought their way back from near-extinction… fb.me/7KYenUdiU Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS Please #VetoExtinction #SHARE Act #HR2406 #Elephants  pic.twitter.com/Sinj0mqmwF   Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct blocks @USFWS from making decisions about cruel/inhumane “predator control” on Alaska’s national wildlife refuges @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems #StandForWolves and wildlife in #Alaska Vote NO #SHAREAct #HR2406 pic.twitter.com/0F8ultP5rh  Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct If #Congress caves in 2 the trophy-hunting lobby & passes this scam of a bill, we call upon @POTUS to give it a clean kill shot. Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems The #SHAREAct would open millions of acres to #Trapping Vote down #HR2406  pic.twitter.com/7KVUg3cj1N   Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS The #SHAREAct would open millions of acres to #Trapping Please VETO #HR2406  pic.twitter.com/7KVUg3cj1N   Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct @BarackObama #VetoExtinction Use your pen as your sword and cut this bill down! Veto #HR2406 pic.twitter.com/o0OU8u1XOk    Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS This amendment has been added to #HR2406 VETO the #SHAREAct #Wolves #Alaska  fb.me/7Cu2DJfz3  Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems This amendment has been added to #HR2406 VETO the #SHAREAct #Wolves #Alaska Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS @SenateDems Please set this bill aside! #HR2406 #SHAREAct #EnvironmentalToxins #LeadPoisoning #Eagles bit.ly/1TLypie   Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems #HR2406 is an abomination! Vote NO to the #SHAREAct #animalcruelty #Trapping pic.twitter.com/SZF3Vr8TgK  Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS @SenateDems Please oppose any legislation that seeks to delist #wolves #SHAREAct #HR2406 & #S659 bit.ly/1Qhellk Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct strips #wolves of their federal protections in 4 states under the #ESA among other harmful provisions @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct subverts the judicial process & subjects hundreds of #wolves to hostile state practices! @POTUS pic.twitter.com/9tgIKPQ76A Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct subverts the judicial process & subjects hundreds of #wolves 2 hostile state practices! @SenateDems pic.twitter.com/9tgIKPQ76A Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct would deny proper oversight of toxic #lead in the environment. @POTUS @SenateDems #Eagles bit.ly/1TLypie Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems Vote NO to the #SHAREAct #HR2406 This is what happens when #wolves R #delisted: bit.ly/1RCTWJQ

pic.twitter.com/R9gHwS09Qh Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS VETO the #SHAREAct #HR2406 Delisting #wolves = extirpation: bit.ly/1RCTWJQ

pic.twitter.com/R9gHwS09Qh Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct #HR2406 blocks carefully considered rulemaking to protect animals on national wildlife refuges! @POTUS @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct is grab bag of appalling items that the trophy hunting lobby cannot secure in free standing bills. @POTUS @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct would both subvert judicial processes & undermine the ESA, one of our nation’s bedrock environmental laws @POTUS @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct delists #wolves When delisted in 2012, 20% of the Wisconsin #wolf pop was wiped out in 3 hunting seasons! @POTUS @SenateDems  Tweet4Wolves

Oppose the #SHAREAct When #Wisconsin #wolves were delisted 17 *entire* family units were wiped out! @SenateDems  pic.twitter.com/IpPtaZx5Xn   Tweet4Wolves

VETO the #SHAREAct When #Wisconsin #wolves were delisted 17 *entire* family units were wiped out! @POTUS pic.twitter.com/IpPtaZx5Xn   Tweet4Wolves

NO to #SHAREAct Clearly, federal oversight is necessary 2 provide adequate protections 4 #wolves as required by ESA. @POTUS @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct would help 41 wealthy #polarbear trophy hunters import the heads of rare polar bears they shot in Canada. @POTUS @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

Disgraceful! The #SHAREAct encourages trophy hunters to kill rare species worldwide via import allowances! @POTUS @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct encourages the kill of #EndangeredSpecies because a congressional waiver will allow importation! @POTUS @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct is an atrocious bill which the Senate should take no further action on. @POTUS @SenateDems pic.twitter.com/IpPtaZx5Xn  Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct Fed. court put a stop 2 reckless #wolf slaughter. Politicians shouldn’t undercut judicial review of delisting actions! @POTUS Tweet4Wolves  @SenateDems: Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct is an ugly grab-bag of giveaways 2 special interest groups & is disgraceful! @POTUS @SenateDems  pic.twitter.com/9tgIKPQ76A   Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct would destroy years of work done by animal protection advocates, environmentalists, and conservationists @POTUS  Tweet4Wolves  @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The abhorrent #SHAREAct #HR2406 would deny proper oversight of toxic #lead in the environment @POTUS Please #VETO this bill! Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS #HR2406 #SHAREAct threatens the interests of wildlife, conservation and public lands. Please #veto this bill. Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct will subject hundreds of #wolves to hostile state practices such as baiting @POTUS @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

The #SHAREAct will subject hundreds of #wolves to hostile state practices such as hound hunting @POTUS @SenateDems pic.twitter.com/9tgIKPQ76A   Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct will subject #wildlife & #wolves 2 hostile practices such painful steel-jawed leghold traps. @SenateDems pic.twitter.com/SZF3Vr8TgK  Tweet4Wolves @POTUS Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct would declare millions of acres of public lands automatically open 2 hunting & trapping @SenateDems  pic.twitter.com/7KVUg3cj1N  Tweet4Wolves

VETO #SHAREAct would declare millions of acres public lands automatically open 2 hunting & trapping @POTUS  pic.twitter.com/7KVUg3cj1N Tweet4Wolves

VETO the #SHAREAct and #S659 Senate version @POTUS see the link between hunting & #ChildAbuse: exm.nr/1StD5sj @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct blocks @USFWS from making decisions about cruel/inhumane predator control on Alaska’s national wildlife refuges @SenFeinstein Tweet4Wolves

@SenatorBoxer Tweet4Wolves

@SenBennetCO Tweet4Wolves

@SenBlumenthal Tweet4Wolves

@ChrisMurphyCT Tweet4Wolves

@SenatorCarper Tweet4Wolves

@ChrisCoons Tweet4Wolves

@SenBillNelson Tweet4Wolves

@SenBrianSchatz Tweet4Wolves

@maziehirono Tweet4Wolves

@SenatorDurbin Tweet4Wolves

@SenDonnelly Tweet4Wolves

@SenAngusKing Tweet4Wolves

@SenatorBarb Tweet4Wolves

@SenatorCardin Tweet4Wolves

@SenWarren Tweet4Wolves

Vote NO #SHAREAct strips #wolves of federal protections in 4 states under the #ESA @SenMarkey @stabenow @Peters4Michigan @jontester  Tweet4Wolves

Vote NO #SHAREAct strips #wolves of federal protection under #ESA in 4 states @amyklobuchar @alfranken @clairecmc @jontester @CoryBooker   Tweet4Wolves

Vote NO #SHAREAct strips #wolves of federal protection under #ESA in 4 states @SenatorBaldwin @Sen_JoeManchin @PattyMurray @SenatorCantwell Tweet4Wolves

Vote NO #SHAREAct strips #wolves of federal protection under #ESA in 4 states @MarkWarner @timkaine @SenatorLeahy @SenSanders Tweet4Wolves

 Vote NO #SHAREAct subverts the judicial process & subjects hundreds of #wolves to hostile state practices!
@SenBobCasey @SenToomey Tweet4Wolves

Vote NO #SHAREAct subverts the judicial process & subjects hundreds of #wolves to hostile state practices!
@RonWyden @SenJeffMerkley  Tweet4Wolves

Vote NO #SHAREAct subverts the judicial process & subjects hundreds of #wolves to hostile state practices! @SenatorMenendez @CoryBooker Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct blocks @USFWS from making decisions about cruel/inhumane predator control on Alaska’s national wildlife refuges @SenatorMenendez Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct blocks @USFWS from making decisions about cruel/inhumane predator control on Alaska’s national wildlife refuges @CoryBooker Tweet4Wolves

Oppose the #SHAREAct which would deny proper oversight of toxic #lead in the #environment @SenateDems VETO #HR2406 @POTUS  Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct would help 41 wealthy #polarbear trophy hunters import the heads of rare polar bears they shot in Canada VETO #HR2406 @POTUS Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems More than 60 conservation organizations signed an open letter opposing the Sportsmen’s Act. VETO #HR2406 #S659 @POTUS Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems #SHAREAct Threatens #Wolves, #Elephants, #PolarBears, #Birds, People and pets! VETO #HR2406 @POTUS pic.twitter.com/o0OU8u1XOk  Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS #Alaska voters oppose cruel methods of killing wildlife:  bit.ly/StopTheCrueltyAlaska VETO #SHAREAct @SenateDems @lisamurkowski Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct “If this misguided legislation is enacted #elephants are likely to go #extinct in our lifetime” on.fb.me/1LFdDPY @POTUS  Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct “If this misguided legislation is enacted #elephants are likely 2 go #extinct in our lifetime” on.fb.me/1LFdDPY @SenateDems Tweet4Wolves

VETO the #SHAREAct There’s nothing sporting about #wolf slaughter, #elephant poaching or #LeadPoisoning pic.twitter.com/Sinj0mqmwF @POTUS Tweet4Wolves

#SHAREAct creates dangerous loophole allowing trophy-hunted polar #bears 2 be imported. @POTUS @SenateDems pic.twitter.com/XrtZ8vq0N1 Tweet4Wolves

VETO #SHAREAct Two-thirds of PolarBears are expected to be wiped out by 2050 due to #ClimateChange @POTUS pic.twitter.com/3xsvdGCPXC  Tweet4Wolves

NO #SHAREAct Two-thirds of PolarBears are expected to be wiped out by 2050 due to #ClimateChange @SenateDems pic.twitter.com/3xsvdGCPXC  Tweet4Wolves

.@POTUS #Alaska voters oppose cruel methods of killing wildlife: bit.ly/StopTheCrueltyAlaska VETO #SHAREAct pic.twitter.com/0F8ultP5rh  Tweet4Wolves

.@SenateDems #Alaska voters oppose cruel methods of killing wildlife: bit.ly/StopTheCrueltyAlaska NO #SHAREAct @repdonyoung  Tweet4Wolves

*Legislative action may be occurring on S.659 in lieu of or in parallel to action on this bill. Please find a list of tweets against this legislation here, where you will also find a list of all U.S. Senators twitter handles, should you care to send a personalized tweet.

Please send a simple cut and paste email to your Senators. Find their email address here. If you prefer you can send an email via democracy.io, here.

Email President Obama here.

Feel free to personalize and use this sample email:

H.R. 2406 SHARE Act

Please oppose H.R. 2406 SHARE Act. The SHARE ACT (Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act, the House version of the Senate’s Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act) is comprised of numerous, irresponsible, pro-hunting and anti-environment regulations, and represents a clear assault on wildlife with  (as of Friday, February 26th) two additional, extremely troubling, amendments. One, from Representative Don Young, which would roll back new federal rules on hunting predators on Alaska’s national preserves, and a similar proposed rule for refuges (National Park Service). This amendment would override a proposed rule from FWS which “clarifies how existing mandates for the conservation of natural and biological diversity, biological integrity, and environmental health on refuges in Alaska relate to predator control; prohibits several particularly effective methods and means for take of predators”. This would formally establish a goal of biodiversity as the guiding principle of federal management of wildlife refuges (The Fish and Wildlife Service says the rule makes clear it would have no impact on subsistence hunters). The amendment, would allow Alaska to continue intensive predator management to allow for more moose and caribou turning our wildlife preserves into game farms.
The other added amendment would strip wolves of their federal protections in four states under the Endangered Species Act, subverting the judicial process and subjecting hundreds of wolves to hostile state practices such as baiting, hound hunting, and painful steel-jawed leghold traps. This amendment was offered by Congressman Reid Ribble.

This omnibus bill combines many bad bills related to environmental resources into one, and contains numerous problematic portions with dire implications for wildlife and the ecosystems they need in order to thrive. This bill panders to special interests and sacrifices smart conservation policy for political cache. H.R. 2406 would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of the Interior, and the Department of Agriculture from regulating lead (a potent and dangerous neurotoxin) in fishing tackle and ammunition (An estimated 10-20 million animals die from lead poisoning each year in the United States after ingesting lead shot, bullet fragments, and sport fishing waste). *It would define trapping (outlawed in nearly 90 countries as barbaric, cruel, and inhumane) as a form of hunting which would open up more federal lands to the setting of steel-jaw leghold traps and other body-gripping traps that pose grave risks to public safety, wildlife, endangered species and pets. *This bill would declare that millions of acres of public lands are automatically open to hunting and trapping without any scrutiny. Public land managers seeking to disallow these activities in order to protect wildlife, habitat, and the public would face enormous bureaucratic hurdles. *The SHARE Act would compel the National Park Service to allow private hunters to shoot bison in the Grand Canyon National Park as part of its management plan. These are just several of the horrific provisions of this bill, which would destroy years of work done by animal protection advocates, environmentalists, and conservationists to protect endangered species and other wildlife. Other provisions in this huge bill would prevent the public from having a say in National Wildlife Refuge decisions, and waive important environmental reviews for this system as well. Such blind dedication to implementing recreational killing is detrimental to both conservation efforts and goes against the wishes of the majority of Americans, and their desire to protect the wilderness and wildlife. This is a disgraceful bill which I ask that you set aside permanently.

Thankyou for your time and consideration of this extremely important matter,

Your name

1421679718611.jpg

Thankyou for being a voice for the voiceless. Please feel free to send off these tweets as often as you like until these horrible proposals are dismissed.

Copyright © 2015 [COPYRIGHT Intheshadowofthewolf, name and webpage]. All Rights Reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Advertisements

Dragging Alaska’s Predator Management Policies Into The 21st Century

Voice Your Opposition to Alaska’s Shameful Predator Control Program.

UPDATE: The comment period has been extended 30 days. Please comment by April 7, 2016. Thankyou.

Generally the federal government allows the State of Alaska (and other states) to manage hunting and fishing on federal lands. But sometimes the State refuses to follow federal mandates even though Federal management authority always takes preference over state management directives. The USFWS is mandated to “protect natural diversity and abundance”.

Under Title VIII (Subsistence Management And Use) of the Alaska National Interests Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA), Alaska Natives and other rural residents were granted hunting and fishing rights (when fish and game are not under outside threat) on National Preserves. The ANILCA did not, however, allow Alaska to manage its wildlife as it has been ~ which is not unlike a game farm, where wolves and bears are decimated to allow unchecked trophy hunting and commercial guiding, and led to the implementation of tighter restrictions by the National Park Service. Alaska is unique among the 50 states for allowing sport and subsistence hunting in the 17 million acres of national preserves added to the National Park System by the ANILCA.  While Congress recognized the “important value of  subsistence and (sadly, and in my opinion disgracefully) sport hunting”, it allowed both to take place only where consistent with the mandate to protect and conserve wildlife resources.

State sport hunting regulations passed by the Alaska Board of Game apply on public lands, but only when those regulations do not conflict with federal mandates or National Park policies. The Board, however, has noticeably become increasingly aggressive in its efforts to implement predator control on federal public lands through liberalization of sport hunting and trapping regulations. For example in 1994, the Alaska Legislature passed the Intensive Management Statute with which the explicit goal was to maintain, restore, or increase the abundance of big game  populations for human consumptive  use.
The following 2 maps illustrate the enormous expansion of state designated predator control areas (PCA) from 2001 to 2014. The maps also show that the boundaries of most national preserves had been encroached upon and many  had become virtually surrounded by  Predator Control Areas in just 14 years. Note the vast increase of “wolf control” areas (in yellow).

screenshot_2016-01-10-13-45-40_1.jpg

screenshot_2016-01-10-13-45-23_1.jpg

The Board has also practiced intensive  management by liberalizing sport hunting regulations, including:

*increasing bag limits from five per season up to 20 per season or 10 per day (as high as 20 a day for wolves in some areas of the state), and liberalizing hunting  seasons for predators to increase their “harvest”.
*eliminating the need for hunters to obtain or purchase hunting tags or permits for predators.
*permitting  the incidental taking of predators.
*authorizing same-day airborne hunting  and trapping, which allows hunters to take predators the same day they’ve  been flying.
*allowing the use of bait to lure predators.
*And, of course, the aerial gunning of wolves. Note that in 2011, the Board issued an emergency order to extend wolf hunting and trapping seasons in GMUs 9 and 10 to increase caribou numbers and as a way of getting around the U.S. Fish & Wildlife’s prohibition on aerial wolf control programs on Unimak  Island. Furthermore, the board has  repeatedly refused to reduce the impact of its programs on national preserves.  For example, in the spring  of 2014, the  radio-collared Lost Creek wolf pack left the borders of the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve and was eliminated  through aerial shooting by state agents implementing one of the Board’s intensive management plans. The Park Service had been studying the Lost Creek pack for seven years as part of a roughly 20-year study of wolves in the Yukon Charley National Preserve; The State  predator control efforts killed 36 wolves in the area in a single year, reducing the preserve’s population by over half. Another example is the Board’s 2010 elimination of the 122 square-mile buffer adjacent to Denali National Park that protected wolves crossing its boundaries from hunting and trapping~Two years later, the wolf populations in the Park were the lowest in decades.
The USFWS should prevent application of state regulations which are incompatible with management objectives for the nearly 77 million acres of wildlife refuges across the state. Period.
The National Park Service has also been at odds with the State which led to the implementation of tighter restrictions on sport hunting (the closure regulations became effective Nov. 23 2015, and new hunting regulations effective January 1 2016. More information regarding the NPS regulations can be found here.

In contrast to the goal of the Game Board, which is to ensure maximum sustained populations for hunting a proposed new rule from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would limit predator control in national wildlife refuges and is deserving of your support.

The draft rule, published in the Federal Register, aligns with a similar National Park Service rule that was finalized in October, banning abhorrent practices such as bear baiting, and the Game Boards’ liberal predator control “management” which could “disrupt natural processes and wildlife interactions” (In recent years, the Game Board has allowed harvesting of brown bears at black bear bait stations, taking wolves during denning season and has classified black bears as fur-bearers and big game species, “which could allow for trapping and snaring of bears and sale of their hides and skulls”).
The Proposed Rule “clarifies how existing mandates for the conservation of natural and biological diversity, biological integrity, and environmental health on refuges in Alaska relate to predator control; prohibits several particularly effective methods and means for take of predators”. This would formally establish a goal of biodiversity as the guiding principle of federal management of wildlife refuges (The Fish and Wildlife Service says the rule makes clear it would have no impact on subsistence hunters).

That, of course, stands in contrast to the goal of the Game Board, which is to alter or manipulate natural predator-prey dynamics to increase human harvest of ungulates.

Heather Tonneson, a regional refuge ecologist for the Fish and Wildlife Service, who was one of the rule’s primary authors, said the rule would “clarify existing legal mandates”. Tonneson also noted that the agency is “not done yet. It’s a proposed rule” and the agency wants to hear from the public and is open to changes.
I, myself, believe that their intent is to rein in Alaska, and make it clear to everyone that this sort of Intensive Management of predators is not going to be allowed.

Please show your support for this proposed new rule from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that would limit predator control in national wildlife refuges, it would help put an end to the suffering and death of many of our voiceless friends.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is taking public comment until March 7th, though, Alaska Gov. Bill Walker plans to ask the federal government to double the public comment period for the rule.

There will be nine public hearings. Comments can be submitted online through regulations.gov  using docket number FWS-R7-NWRS-2014-0005, or directly here.

Or by mail to: Public Comments Processing, Attn: [FWS-R7-NWRS-2014-0005]; Division of Policy, Performance, and Management Programs; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS: BPHC; 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041.

Below, please find a sample comment, please personalize.  Note: Agencies review all submissions, however some agencies may choose to redact, or withhold, certain submissions (or portions thereof) such as those containing private or proprietary information, inappropriate language, or duplicate/near duplicate examples of a mass-mail campaign.

Sample comment:

It is my understanding that this proposal to amend regulations for National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska was developed in response to public concern about predator control and recent liberalization of predator “harvest” within the State of Alaska. Thankyou, and I welcome a policy encouraging the maintenance of more biological diversity on refuges, and an end to the horrific “predator control” found to be acceptable and encouraged by the State.

State regulations which have long authorized the hunting/trapping and other intensive management actions that involve predator reduction efforts with the intent or potential to alter or manipulate natural predator-prey dynamics and associated ecological processes (to increase human harvest of ungulates) is in conflict with the federal mandate, and abhorrent.

I appreciate the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ proposed rule which would clarify that predator control is not allowed on national wildlife refuges in Alaska, “unless necessary to meet refuge purposes, federal laws or Service policy, and is consistent with the agency’s conservation mission”, and appreciate your efforts here.

It is high time that Alaska stop treating our national preserves like game farms, and wholeheartedly support this proposal,

Your name

Thankyou, in advance, for your anticipated efforts on behalf of the wildlife on our National Preserves in Alaska.

USFWS News Release | Related content 

Copyright © 2015 [COPYRIGHT Intheshadowofthewolf, name and webpage]. All Rights Reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

1452548403845.jpg

Restrictions On Predator Hunting Will Help Prevent Steep and Long Term Depression of Predator Populations

Good news for Alaska’s Wildlife and Wolves
Over the past decade, the National Park Service has objected to at least 50 proposals by Alaska wildlife officials to liberalize the killing of predators within national preserves. The conflict can be traced back to 1994, when the Alaska Legislature passed a law mandating that the Board of Game pursue intensive management “to maintain, restore, or increase the abundance of big game prey populations for human consumptive use,” according to a 2007 article in the Alaska Law Review by University of Alaska, Fairbanks, professor Julie Lurman and NPS subsistence manager Sanford Rabinowitch.
“Predator control”, which aims to suppress numbers of bears, wolves and coyotes in order to boost prey species, including moose and caribou, is incompatible with the Park Service’s mandate to preserve “natural ecosystems,” including at its 20 million acres of national preserves in Alaska (Sport hunting, illegal in national parks, is allowed in Alaska’s national preserves under a law Congress passed in 1980).
NPS first proposed a permanent ban on three predator hunting practices in 2014. These practices were illegal under Alaska law until approval (several years ago) by the state’s Board of Game. That proposal bans the baiting of brown ‪‎bears‬, the hunting of wolves and‪ coyotes‬ during the denning and pupping period, and the use of artificial light to shoot black bear sows and cubs at their dens, a technique known as “spotlighting.”
Now, after a long and heated battle, National Park Service will implement tighter restrictions on sport hunting with the closure regulations become effective Nov. 23, and new hunting regulations effective January 1st of next year. State officials, needless to say, are not pleased.
The new restrictions include these changes to sport hunting regulations on national preserves:

*NPS prohibits taking wolves and coyotes during the denning season.
*NPS prohibits the taking of any black bear using artificial lights at den sites including cubs and sows with cubs.
*NPS prohibits taking brown and black bears over bait.
*NPS will not allow hunters to use dogs to hunt black bears, while it is permitted by state rules.
*NPS will not allow hunters to shoot swimming caribou from a boat or shoot caribou that have emerged from the water onto the shoreline while the hunter is still on the boat, though state rules permit both.

wpid-1422915858934.jpg

The manipulation of natural population dynamics conflicts with National Park Service law and policy. National park areas are managed to maintain natural ecosystems and processes, including wildlife populations and their behaviors. While sport hunting is allowed by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in national preserves in Alaska, NPS policies prohibit reducing native predators for the purpose of increasing numbers of harvested species.

For years, the National Park Service had repeatedly requested the State of Alaska and the Alaska Board of Game to exempt national preserves from state regulations that liberalized hunting methods, seasons and bag limits for predators. State officials denied those requests, as well as also objecting to the use of repeated temporary federal closures.

“Sport hunting” occurs on about 38 percent  (more than 20 million acres) of the land managed by the National Park Service in Alaska. In these national preserves, sport hunting generally occurs under state regulations. Though a large majority of state sport hunting regulations would remain unchanged, this is an enormous step in the right direction and puts a stop to these abhorrent acts of inhumanity in and around Alaska’s national parks and preserves.

National Park System areas, including preserves, already prohibit other predator control actions, such as aerial shooting of wolves, a horrific practice which the State of Alaska conducts as part of its statewide wildlife “management” program.

Featured Graphic: National Parks Conservation Association

Related News